explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.
Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.
Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.
Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.
The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.

Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.

Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.

Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.

The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

deerthing:

creatingmyowndreams:

rekit:


The best deodorant you will ever use Seriously. 1/4 teaspoon in each pit and you can sweat your ass off, totally stink-free for like 2 full days. It’s a natural anti-bacterial so those little fuckers won’t multiply and make you smell. Plus it’s cheaper and healthier than any deod you can buy anywhere.
Use equal parts of the following:
-corn starch-baking soda-coconut oil-cocoa butter
With a few drops of whatever essential oil you want, for fragrance. Otherwise it basically just smells like nothing. I use tea tree oil & pine needle oil. Cuz they’re MANLY.
Note - It pretty much turns to liquid if it’s warmer than about 75 degrees. If you want to keep it solid, you can refrigerate it or add a little more corn starch.

Reblogging myself again, cuz I still use this and it’s still awesome

This is what I’ve been using for about a year now and it works wonders. Not convinced it works? My fiance is literally the smelliest human being I’ve ever met when he’s been sweating all day. I made him some with tea tree oil and he now smells nice and mint-ish as the end of the day, even if he’s been outside working. Not to mention it’s cheaper, smells better, better for you AND better for the environment to make your own :D

reblogging so i don’t forget to try this!!!!!! i hate most store-bought roll-on deodorants you don’t even know

deerthing:

creatingmyowndreams:

rekit:

The best deodorant you will ever use

Seriously. 1/4 teaspoon in each pit and you can sweat your ass off, totally stink-free for like 2 full days. It’s a natural anti-bacterial so those little fuckers won’t multiply and make you smell. Plus it’s cheaper and healthier than any deod you can buy anywhere.

Use equal parts of the following:

-corn starch
-baking soda
-coconut oil
-cocoa butter

With a few drops of whatever essential oil you want, for fragrance. Otherwise it basically just smells like nothing. I use tea tree oil & pine needle oil. Cuz they’re MANLY.

Note - It pretty much turns to liquid if it’s warmer than about 75 degrees. If you want to keep it solid, you can refrigerate it or add a little more corn starch.

Reblogging myself again, cuz I still use this and it’s still awesome

This is what I’ve been using for about a year now and it works wonders.

Not convinced it works? My fiance is literally the smelliest human being I’ve ever met when he’s been sweating all day. I made him some with tea tree oil and he now smells nice and mint-ish as the end of the day, even if he’s been outside working.

Not to mention it’s cheaper, smells better, better for you AND better for the environment to make your own :D

reblogging so i don’t forget to try this!!!!!! i hate most store-bought roll-on deodorants you don’t even know

unwrapping:

Tumblr Dashboard Image Sizes:

  • Photo post: 500 by 750 pixels for dashboard view; 1280 by 1920 pixels for high-res version (except for superwide panoramas).
  • Photoset: 500-pixel width for one image in a photoset row. 245-pixel width for two images in a photoset row. 160-pixel width for three images in a photoset row. Gutters are 10 pixels.
  • Audio Post: 169 by 169 pixels for album art.
  • Link Post: 130 by 130 pixels for the thumbnail image grabbed by Tumblr from web link (if available).
  • Text Post: 125-pixel width for images added to a text post, which expand when clicked.
  • Avatar: 64-by-64-pixel icon next to posts.

royallyvintage:

A guide to common terms used in describing tiaras

I do the research so that you don’t have to: MCU/Captain America Edition

minim-calibre:

A history of asthma rescue medicine  (note: those rescue inhalers we all know and love? Only slightly older than Peter Capaldi.) Seriously, guys: assume every fucking medical thing we take for granted did not yet exist, and if you think it might have, Doctors Bing and Google can tell you if you’re on the right track. Just search for “history of [insert medical technology here].” 

The American Consumer Home Front WWII 

Census.gov’s 1940s page

Brooklyn Historical Society

1940s New York

Life in the 1940s in Brooklyn (personal memories of someone)

More personal memories of Brooklyn in the 1940s

Forgotten New York’s Brooklyn tag

Wikipedia on iceboxes (Also, even if there was an electric refrigerator, ever seen an old-school one? Not like what we’ve got now, I tell you what.)

Some basics to get you started. I’ve read too many otherwise lovely stories that throw me out because of anachronisms. Which, you know, happens when you’re Tumblr Old. Especially when you’re Tumblr Old, and your parents were of very mature years when you were born. (Old enough to remember WWII, they are!)

For reasons various and sundry, WWII America is a research gold mine, and friends don’t let friends write without research.

(Also, feel free to reblog. I’ve no idea how to tag this so people can find it, but damn it, I want them to.)

legit-writing-tips:

writersyoga:

Quick 50 Writing Tools - Roy Peter Clark 

Some good info on here.

There’s a pretty good chance that things are never going back to normal.

“Psychologists have found that people’s belief in a just world helps explain how they react to innocent victims of negative life circumstances. People become cognitively frustrated when presented with stories of victims who suffer through little fault of their own. They can deal with this frustration in two ways: they can conclude that the world is an unjust place, or they can decide that the victim is somehow to blame. Most people reconcile their psychological distress by blaming the victim. Even when we know that suffering is undeserved, it is psychologically easier to blame the victim rather than give up the idea that the world is basically fair.”

Melissa Harris-Perry

This is also referred to as The Just World Fallacy. If the world is “good and just,” then bad things must only happen to people who “deserved it or caused it.” Except the world is not good and just. And despite individual people choosing to be good and/or just, structures, institutions and systems remain corrupt overall. Primarily through the media is the idea that bad only happens to those who deserve suffering conveyed. Add this to the manifestations of oppression based on gender, race, class, nationality, citizenship, sexual orientation, size, etc. and things like rape culture for example, thrive. And even ideologies that appear “harmless” to some people like prosperity gospel, positivity culture, the law of attraction and American exceptionalism are based on ignoring systemic inequality and focusing on exceptional cases. They stand firm in this particular fallacy.

See, it requires quite a bit from a person to be willing to challenge the world as is. It is psychologically, emotionally and intellectually easier to victim blame. It also helps people protect their psyches from the thought that something bad could happen to them or worse, that they are the causes of those bad things happening to others.

Still…it’s unacceptable. Victim blaming = unacceptable. The right thing to do is listen and support victims/survivors of anything and the oppressed of any form of oppression and work to deconstruct the structures, institutions and systems that make it possible. On an individual level, it requires accountability.

(via gradientlair)